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genocide

Persevering for Peace

This year, Liguorian magazine gave me a dream commission — writing four articles on diverse aspects of peace. We began with an exploration of interfaith peace and ways the Bible embraces the whole world, including people of varying faiths. Next, we ventured into the valley of the shadows of death and terrorism, and saw how the light of God shines even there. Thirdly, we considered how theology and practice can empower us to respond peacefully to violence wherever it occurs.

Remembrance is not enough - What could have been different

This month, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) is attending events in Rwanda and posting news online about the history of the Tutsi genocide. At numerous points, the story could have gone differently. What if Romeo Dallaire's fax warning the UN of impending violence was heeded? What if the Arusha Accord was implemented? It's extremely painful to imagine that human error and complicity prevented us from averting the genocide. However, it's worth the difficult look if we can learn from these mistakes.

A Senegalese Hero Remembered

"I’ve covered many wars and seen many acts of courage. But for sheer grit and determination I’ve never known anyone to compare with Captain Mbaye Diagne, a United Nations peacekeeper in Rwanda," said Mark Doyle, an international development correspondent. Armed only with cigarettes and whisky, and an indefatigable sense of humour, Diagne talked his way through numerous checkpoints, transporting people to the safety of Hotel Mille Collines, or bringing messages between the UN and government forces.

 

Rwanda Ready to Share Peace

Reverend Désiré Rutaganda is the Coordinator of the Centre for Documentation and Training in Kigali, Rwanda. This interfaith organisation was established in 1999 to live out the Christian values of peace and reconciliation, which were disappointingly absent from some churches and believers during the Tutsi genocide. Today, as people of God, they model how peace can transform communities for peace at the grassroots. Their dream is that today's youth will never know the war that plagued Rwanda from 1959 to 1993, and instead, will be agents of peace.

April and genocide

Gerald Caplan
Globe and Mail Update
Friday, Apr. 30, 2010
 
...Last week I spoke at a memorial service at Tufts University in Boston. Jewish and Rwandan survivors and the granddaughter of Armenian survivors were joined by a survivor of the Cambodian killing fields for a deeply affecting evening. We first remember the past to honour the victims, and every one of the speakers lost a mind-numbing number of family in his or her respective apocalypse...
 
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