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Responding Peacefully to Violence

They were humiliated and mistreated, and they couldn’t take it anymore. So they took a stand. They went into extensive training for the fight. They knew it would be hard and long. They had to be mentally, spiritually, and physically prepared. When the day of confrontation arrived, every hour of training was worth it. Although they were shouted at, pushed, spat upon, and beaten, they did not fight back with angry words or fists, but with love. They won, peacefully.

Empathy and acceptance bring peace to shooting victim Danielle Kane

On July 22. 2018, an ordinary summer's evening, Danielle Kane was celebrating a friend's birthday in one of the restaurants in Toronto's popular Greek Town. She hasn't gone home since. When she stepped outside to investigate what sounded like fireworks, she looked an ordinary looking stranger in the eye. Then he fired a gun at her. The bullet went through her spinal cord and stomach. Danielle was rushed to the hospital.

Finding Peace After Tragedy

I wish I didn't have to write this. I wish I was writing an Easter message about lent leading to resurrection, or videos and stories about meeting Martin Luther King, Jr.'s family in Atlanta this month, or news from the peace and justice conference I attended there. But a tragedy has struck my city, Toronto, and I am compelled to walk the long path back to peace with my fellow Torontonians, and the others around the world whose hearts are with us at this time.

Our Role in God's Peace Plan

Our peace series in Liguorian magazine, which began with Lighting the Way to Interfaith Peace in January, continues by examining one of the most darkest valleys humans encounter — acts of terrorism. How do we counteract hate in order to prevent as much violence as possible? And when acts of terrorism do occur, how to do we respond, forgive and heal its onslaught so it doesn't lead us into a cycle of even more violence? The surest way I know is by following God's peace plan.

Mother of a Columbine school shooter analyses the cause (video)

Sue Klebold is the mother of Dylan Klebold, one of the youth who committed murder/suicide in Cobumbine on April 20, 1999. In this transparent reflection, Sue shares, "It was appallingly easy for a 17-year-old boy to buy guns both legally and illegally without my permission or knowledge and somehow, 17 years and many school shootings later, it is still appallingly easy.”

Columbine Courage

Columbine Courage book cover

Columbine Courage shares inspiring responses to terrorism by Christian youth and leaders who wanted to make a positive difference after the tragic school shooting in Columbine High School in 1999. On April 20, 1999, two students opened fire in Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, leaving 13 dead and 25 injured.

I survived a terrorist attack. Here’s what I learned. - Gill Hicks

Gill Hicks, who survived a suicide bombing in London, used a tragedy that was meant to kill her to change her life. Gill says, “Throughout all the chaos my hand was held tightly. My face was stroked gently. What did I feel? I felt loved. What’s shaded me from hatred and wanting retribution, what’s given me the courage to say, ‘This ends with me,’ is love. I was loved. I believe the potential for widespread positive change is absolutely enormous because I know what we’re capable of. I know the brilliance of humanity.

After Nice, Prayers for Peace

Last night, when I heard about the attack in Nice, France, I immediately thought of my friend from France, Valérie Baron. She shared these thoughts today, which are so important as we grieve, and reflect on how to bring peace to a very hurting world.

I was thinking about my home country again today.  I was there during the November attacks and I wasn't far away. I am thinking of the  atrocity and fear that comes along with it. It is not pleasant, to say the least. I don't think I will ever get over the Paris, and now Nice, attacks.

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